Dead Fred's Genealogy Photo Archive
Dead Fred Info
Photo Archive
Highlights of Dead Fred
Community Section

v1.4.2001

Unearthing Relevant News, Advice and Updates for the Living
©DeadFred.com

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Dead Fred's Meditation Corner

"Heredity is a splendid phenomenon that relieves us of responsibility for our shortcomings."

~Doug Larson

If you have a quote or anecdote for our Meditation Corner, send it to us at meditation@deadfred.com.

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Words From The Reunited

Can you tell me the source for your Bridendall photograph? Can you tell me the age of the photograph? If the location was Quanah and the picture was taken in 1890, you have located the only picture in existence of my great-grandparents.

~John Philip Bridendall of Louisville, KY


I just discovered my Uncle Lawrence Allen BLAISDELL. He graduated from UM in 1915. They nicknamed him 'The Little Runt.' Well, that little runt went along way. He was born in Lynn, MA, and died in 1972 in San Bernadino, CA. Lawrence never married. He went to Hollywood after being in the Navy. He dated several young starlets. Norma Shearer was one. I went to live in San Bernadino with my grandparents in 1959. Uncle Lawrence was living in Hollywood; he took me to Sunset Blvd., Brown Derby, Moulin Rouge and Graumann's Chinese theater as well as introduced me to several of his friends. He was 'THE BLAISDELL PLAYBOY.' Thought you'd enjoy. Thanks.

~Joan Blaisdell


Re: Photo 1917

I would be really proud if the discovery was mine, but it was my cousin, Connie Metzger Booth, who discovered the picture and e-mailed me a message to 'see deadfred.com. Could this be our Ida??'

With a huge family resemblance and perfect location, age and time match...it could be no one else! Since all is fair in love and war...but families sometimes forget which of those they are in...first dibs on the picture goes to Connie. I'm sure she'll see that I get a copy.

Ida Kinsey, born September 16, 1873, was the oldest daughter of Dr. David Sourbray Kinsey and Mary Elnor Seburn. My grandmother, Abigail Maud Kinsey Miller, and Connie's grandmother, Margaret Lucretia Kinsey Metzger, were two of her sisters. My best guess is that this is Aunt Ida's high school graduation picture.

~Ms. Fansler

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Letters To The Archivists

Congratulations!

Family Tree Magazine at www.familytreemagazine.com has chosen Dead Fred at www.deadfred.com as Site of the Day for 9/2/01 because we think it will be a wonderful online resource for our readers.

Family Tree Magazine is the new magazine about discovering, preserving and celebrating your family’s history. Though our magazine’s Web site has only been live since October 1999, 100,000 people are visiting us each month, and more are coming each day. We hope our site’s visitors will check out Dead Fred when it’s highlighted on our home page. Also, because your site will be mentioned again in our weekly e-mail newsletter and indexed in our Select Site Resource Guide at http://www.familytreemagazine.com/categories.php

Family Tree Magazine will continue to send more visitors your way. (Look for your listing under the Photographs category.) Please let me know if you would like one of two different GIF logos--one horizontal, one vertical--that you can place on your Web site to let visitors know you were chosen as a Family Tree Magazine Site of the Day. If in the future you add a new, significant feature to your site, please let me know. We may feature your site again as Site of the Day because of the additional value to our visitors!

Please contact me if you have any questions. Again, we salute your excellent site and hope it continues to grow in the future!

Susan Wenner
Associate Editor, Family Tree Magazine
Web: http://www.familytreemagazine.com
Mail: 1507 Dana Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45207 USA


Subject: Five Items

These are the 5 items I would place in a treasure box:

1. a heart-shaped box.....to know I was in love
2. a picture of my children.....to know I loved my children
3. a game of some sort.....to know I loved a challenge
4. a leaf.....to know I was a nature lover
5. a CD of selected music of my choice.....to know I was a music lover

SnoWhite2u


Below is the result of your feedback form. It was submitted by
() on Sunday, August 26, 2001 at 17:34:48

I already subscribed to your newsletter/mailing list with e-mail preference. Just needed to ask as I see gaps for some common surnames - do you build your archive via private photo contributions from us out here or do you limit to only what you find? I've several photos from my own records, and I know other amateur genealogists who have a good photo archive they might share. Too, I work in an Interdenominational Children's Home, and as we get assorted donations, I've seen several things come to our donation room such as old photos, letters, family Bibles (I can't BELIEVE a family member would part with such!), but perhaps you'd be a reliable repository for such in case later family interest is revived. Please let me know if this is possible and how you would wish such items shipped to you. You're providing a needed service. Bless you!

Unknown Author

Hi there,

I would first like to apologize for not writing back to you sooner. I have been experiencing some computer problems, but all is well now.

I found your letter fascinating. To give you a little info about DeadFred, Joe Bott has been collecting 'vintage' photographs for many years now. He has acquired them through donations as well as purchasing them at yard sales, antique shops and even Ebay.

We would be delighted to have the photographs and other items you acquire. You can either submit your photographs by either scanning or mailing them. If you decide to mail them, they will then become the property of DeadFred.com. If we are able to find a family member, we will return the 'item;' however, we will always have a digital image of that item.

Here is the address and phone number:

Dead Fred Genealogy Photo Archive
P.O Box 6937
Springdale, AR 72766-6937
(501) 927-3330

Thanks again! If you have any other questions/concerns, I would be more than happy to help.

Regards,
Claire Bott
claire@deadfred.com


Whether you have a bone to pick or a eulogy to offer, send your thoughts to letters@deadfred.com.

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Pick & Shovel Highlights

Subject: Lockwood Photos
Author: Joan Lockwood
Date: 8/7/2001 12:51 am CST
I have photos of Henry Skelding Lockwood of Brooklyn, NY, and family circa 1880 - 1910, including a whole family album.
Also photos of Mary Scripture Lockwood w/sister and mother of Ravenna, OH/Chicago, IL, same time period.
Would love to share, identify cousins.
Joan Lockwood
lockwynn2@home.com

Subject: RE: Lockwood photos
Author: Joe (Deadfred.com)
Date: 8/8/2001 10:48 am CST
One of the nice things about sharing your family photos is that you can do that right here at DeadFred.com. With the thousands of visitors we get weekly, there is a good chance that someone in your lineage will find them.
We have folks from all over the world visiting daily looking for family and trying to solve our Mystery Photos.
Simply scan in the photos yourself by following the easy directions in our FAQ page OR make Zerox copies and send them to me at the following address:

Dead Fred's Genealogy Photo Archive
P.O. Box 6937
Springdale, AR 72766-6937
Attn: Joe Bott


Subject: Wynns
Author: Joan Lockwood
Date: 8/7/2001 12:55 am CST
Looking for photo of Archibald Wynns and descendants. Archibald was a civil rights lawyer in Texas in 1830s-1840s. Also land speculator. Served as elected official in the House while Texas was a republic. Died about 1849 in his 40s.
Joan Lockwood
Wife of Chuck Wynns
lockwynn2@home.com


Subject: RE: Viewing Yearbooks!
Author: Joe - Founder DeadFred.com (joe@deadfred.com)
Date: 8/8/2001 5:25 pm CST
I've added a number of College Yearbooks recently. To view the images, type the keyword into the photographers section in detailed search
-The TOM TOM. 1936 Yearbook Tulsa, OK, Keyword 'T'
-The Belfry 1928 Yearbook New Hampton School for Boys New Hampton, New Hampshire, Keyword 'Belfry'
-University of Maine Yearbook 1916 Keyword 'UM'
-1916 Cornellian, Yearbook for Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, Keyword 'Cornell'
-1922 Yearbook The Netherlands Rio Vista Joint Union High School, Rio Vista, California, Keyword 'RV'


Subject: Sandlin Family Photos
Author: Wanda Sandlin Hollingsworth (billyjoe@pepperlink.net)
Date: 8/15/2001 2:31 pm CST
I am searching for photos of my Sandlin ancestors. GGgrandfather Daniel, Ggrandfather Jonathan, Morgan Co., AL. Would be grateful for any photo.


Subject: DINANS WORLDWIDE
Author: www.Dinan.org.uk (names@dinan.org.uk)
Date: 8/19/2001 5:24 am CST
We are collecting worldwide info on the Dinan name. Please send whatever you have; full credit will be given. Thanks.
Chris Dinan


Subject: Welome to DeadFred.com
Author: Joe Bott ( joe@deadfred.com)
Date: 8/23/2001 5:51 pm CST
Hi, I'm Joe Bott the Founder of DeadFred.com.
I'm writing this because I wanted you to know that I built this site for you.
Why? you might ask. Well, did you ever want to know what your Great-Great-Grandparents looked like when they were 15? How about their brothers or sisters or aunts or uncles and cousins or even their old flames before they married your Great-Granddad, or...how about what they looked like...period! I would have given anything to see mine, and the Internet lets me do just that. I found some of them! I thought the least I could do is help you experience that same excitement.

I've been collecting photos since I was 19 years old. Many of the photos were identified - more than 2000 of them actually! So...one day I looked at those pictures; then I looked at my Great-Grandparents' picture...then I looked at my computer and POOF! Here you and I are. I'm excited ! Hope you are too.

So again...welcome to Deadfred.com, a free service to help you find your ancestry...or to check out the styles of clothing of olden days...or to just browse through the Archive just for the fun of it. Feel free to drop me a line, and let me know what you think of Deadfred.com.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot. If you have any couch change lying around, feel free to make a donation. It's my intention to keep this site Free, Free, Free. You can help me do just that, but first you'll need to go to the home page and click on the donation button..

Have Fun!
Joe
Joe@deadfred.com


Subject: RE: Browsing The Archive
Author: hazel (hazelcrystal@hotmail.com)
Date: 8/25/2001 3:56 pm CST
I have quite a collection of old photos but no idea who the subjects are. How do I get them on to this web site?


Subject: RE: Weaver, Waters, Adam, Sheehan, Mahon
Author: martha raby (martharaby@earthlink.net)
Date: 8/26/2001 6:44 pm CST
Dear Dee,
From where did Otto and Emil Adam hail? I'm working on my Weaver lines who, if data is accurate so far, came from Pennsylvania and migrated to Ohio after the Revolutionary War (part of the soldier's pay was land in Ohio). They apparently moved there in the early 1800s. If you have any you're looking for in that area, perhaps I can share some data. My lines include Weaver, Sell, Bollinger, Lehman, some variants of Hershey, etc.
Good luck with your search.

Dee Weaver wrote:

I'd like to have photos of any of these! Especially Otto and Louise Adam and his father, Emil Adam, who was a Major in Spanish-American and Indian wars. Thank you.

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Dead Fred's Poll of the Month


Dead Fred's Poll Of The Month

What time period do you believe had the most style ("classic" look)?

1880s
1920s
1950s
1960s
1980s
1990s
Other

Current results
Free Web Polls

If you chose other, let us know what period.

We'll let you know the poll results next month. Thanks for your participation.

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What's New In The Database?

Surnames Submitted (8/1-8/31)

1916 Elgin High School
Abell
Adamek
Adams
Agnew
Allbright
Allen
Alquis
Althouse
Ammerman
Anderson
Archer
Argue
Armstrong
Arnold
Askew
Atkins
Atkission
Badger
Bailey
Baird
Baker
Baldwin
Banks
Bare
Bareford
Barker
Barnard
Barnes
Barnett
Barron
Bartlett
Baumgardt
Baxter
Bays
Beck
Becker
Beckington
Beifeld
Bell
Bememt
Bement
Bender
Bennett
Bennorth
Benson
Bernier
Berrian
Berry
Best
Bigler
Bihari
Binkley
Black
Blackburn
Blair
Blankenship
Blaylock
Blazer
Blevins
Blinn
Boettcher
Bogert
Bolling
Bollman
Bond
Bonde
Book
Boucher
Bowen
Bowes
Bowman
Boyd
Boyer
Bradley
Bragg
Brain
Brandt
Brant
Bratzler
Breneman
Brian
Brigges
Briggs
Brightman
Brisbin
Bristol
Britton
Brooks
Brools
Brown
Bryant
Buck
Buckmann
Bueche
Buker
Burger
Burman
Burns
Bush
Butler
Buttrick
Byrd
Calame
Callahan
Cameron
Camp
Campbell
Cantrell
Capital
Carey
Carpenter
Carrothers
Carter
Casey
Casson
Cecil
Cervenka
Chandlier
Chase
Chastain
Chenault
Chisholm
Christ
Christie
Clark
Cleveland
Cline
Closson
Cloudman
Clover
Coatney
Cobb
Cockrell
Coder
Coffee
Coffin
Coker
Colby
Coleman
Collins
Combs
Condern
Conely
Consolvo
Cooper
Copeland
Cornelius
Cornwall
Corrubia
Cottingham
Coulter
Covety
Covington
Cowlin
Cox
Craigin
Cramer
Cramsey
Crandall
Crane
Crate
Craven
Crawley
Crissey
Crone
Cross
Culbertson
Cull
Cummings
Curry
Curtis
Cutler
Dack
Damisch
Damish
Daniels
Danielson
Dashner
David
Davis
Davission
Davisson
Dawson
Dayton
Dean
Deiter
Dewey
Dewitt
Dewson
Dickey
Dickson
Dietrick
Dillion
Divine
Dochterman
Doing
Dolby
Dole
Donlon
Donnelly
Doseff
Douglas
Drabelle
Drain
Dugan
Duke
Dunbar
Dunlap
Dunton
Duppler
Durden
Dutsch
Dwyer
Eakin
Eaton
Ebersole
Egan
Egbert
Ekholm
Eldredge
Elliott
Ellis
Ellithorpe
Elms
Elrick
Emma
Endres
England
Engwall
Ensley
Eppleur
Erickson
Erskine
Erwin
Esbenshade
eshelman
Evans
Fanning
Farham
Farling
Farncrook
Faulhaber
Feagley
Feick
Fernald
Fevrier
Findley
Fink
Finnegan
Finnie
Firth
Fischer
Fisher
Fisk
Fitzsimmons
Flanner
Fleming
Foote
Forrest
Forrey
Foster
Fouser
Fowler
Fox
Frame
Franklin
Frantz
Frazee
Fredenberger
Fredenburger
Frederic
Frick
Friedmnan
Frost
Fry
Fulcher
Fulling
Funk
Funnell
Gable
Gaddu
Gaddy
Gage
Gahagan
Gaither
Gammino
Gannaway
Gans
Gantz
Garber
Garrett
Geddes
Gens
Getzelman
Gibbs
Gibson
Giertz
Gifford
Gilday
Gildmacher
Giles
Gill
Gilliam
Gilmer
Giltner
Gingrich
Ginrich
Girouard
Gittinger
Glenn
Glos
Goble
Gochnauer
Goeppinger
Goetschius
Goldman
Goodison
Goodman
Gorman
Goswick
Gougler
Gowan
Gowans
Graham
Granger
Grant
Graves
Green
Grieder
Griffin
Grime
Grimes
Grimshaw
Griswold
Grittenger
Groff
Gronberg
Gruwell
Guier
Gumm
Gylleck
Hagler
Haines
Hake
Hall
Hall Jr.
Hall Sr.
Ham
Hambelton
Hambright
Hamilton
Hamment
Hammett
Hance
Hankla
Hanna
Hansen-Eldhardt
Hardin
Harding
Harnish
Harpin
Harrington
Harris
Harry
Harte
Hartman
Harvey
Haskell
Hatcher
Hatfield
Hausam
Have
Hawkins
Hawley
Haynes
Hays
Hazel
Hecht
Heffernan
Heidenan
Heilman
Helm
Hemphill
Henderson
Herdon
Herr
Hess
Hesse
Hill
Hindricks
Hindsell
Hix
Hock
Hodges
Hogan
Holder
Holt
Holton
Homesher
Hopper
Horner
Horton
House
Houston
Howard
Howarg
Howe
Howry
Hubbell
Huben
Huber
Hubert
Huck
Huckins
Huf
Hukill
Hunt
Hurst
Hussey
Hutchcraft
Hyde
Imprey
Inbody
Ingersoll
Inman
Irizarry
Jacobs
James
Jeffries
Jerome
Jocelyn
Johnson
Johnston
Jolley
Jondahl
Jone
Jones
Jordan
Jordon
Joslyn
Kahn
Kauffman
Kaufmann
Kaulbeck
Kear
Keegan
Keener
Keeshan
Kelley
Kellogg
Kelsey
Kendall
Kendig
Kennedy
Kenyon
Kessler
Kettner
Keuchler
Keyes
Kidd
King
Kingsolver
Kinnane
Kinne
Kinsey
Kinzie
Kitterman
Klauber
Knecht
Knollenberg
Knudsen
Kraus
Krause
Kraybill
Kreider
Krentz
Kress
Krischke
Krueger
Krugh
Kuechler
Kuhn
Labahan
Labahn
LaCour
Lagerstrom
Lakin
Lamberton
Lamborn
Lamp
Lamprick
Lanborn
Landis
Lantz
Larkin
Larse
Larsen
Larson
Larue
Laturner
Laufer
Lavengood
Lazo
Leach
League
Leahy
Leaman
Lee
Lehrbach
Lennartz
Leonard
Lerbscher
Lermer
Lewis
Lindsay
Lindsey
Lindstrand
LinkField
Lisher
Lisle
Livingston
Lockwood
Logan
Lourey
Luckings
Ludington
Lulow
Lungreen
Luttrell
Lyon
Mac kenzie
MacDarmid
MacDiarmid
MacKenzie
Mackey
Macon
Madden
Mallory
Mann
Manning
Maples
Marckhoff
Markus
Marston
Martin
Marvis
Mason
Massey
Mathers
Matthessen
Maxwell
Mayer
McBrayer
McBride
McCalley
McCann
McCarthy
McCarty
McClanahan
McComb
McCright
McCullogh
McCullough
McEntire
McFadden
McHenry
McKee
Mckellar
McKimmie
Mckinney
McKirahan
McMinn
McNabney
McNeill
Mcullough
Meaders
Megee
Meiser
Melhorn
Mellinger
Melton
Meyer
Micou
Miller
Millikin
Minton
Mitchell
Moguin
Mohr
Moncrief
Monroe
Montgomery
Mooar
Moody
Moon
Moore
Morgan
Morrison
Mosse
Mowrer
Moyer
Mullen
Mumme
Murphy
Murray
Murry
Musser
Myer
Myers
Myhr
Neale
Needgham
Neely
Neering
Nelson
Nesbitt
Newbolt
Newkirk
Newman
Nichols
Nieman
Nolt
Nuckolls
Nutter
OBrien
Odermatt
Officer
Oleary
Olsen
Oneal
OÕNeill
Orman
Orr
Orton
Owen
Paddock
Paes
Page
Palmer
Parker
Parks
Parrish
Patten
Patterson
Patton
Paul
Pauly
Payne
Pearce
Pearson
Peckman
Pelich
Perry
Person
Persons
Peterson
Petschow
Phelan
Phelman
Phelps
Philpott
Pierce
Pike
Place
Plumb
Pollack
Pope
Porter
Powell
Pper
Pranter
Pratt
Price
Pringle
Pruitt
Pryde
Purdy
Purkiss
Putman
Ramm
Ramsey
Randolph
Rapson
Rathburn
Rauschert
Rawsomn
Rayner
Reamer
Reams
Reason
Rebman
Rector
Redfield
Reed
Rees
Reese
Reifsnider
Reynolds
Rhodes
Richards
Richardson
Richison
Ricker
Rickert
Riddle
Rider
Riggs
Ringle
Rippberger
Roarke
Roaschach
Roberta
Robertson
Robinowitz
Robinson
Ronan
Roop
Root
Rorabaugh
Rorig
Rose
Ross
Roth
Rowe
Royce
Royer
Rummell
Rush
Russell
Saddler
Sampson
Sanders
Sandusky
Sanger
Sangrey
Sapp
Sarkody
Sattler
Scaley
Schaff
Schally
Scheling
Schelling
Schlager
Schlenker
Schuette
Schultz
Schultze
Schuprach
Scott
Sease
Seaver
Seyforth
Shaf
Shaffer
Shank
Shannon
Sharo
Shaw
Shay
Shelley
Shepard
Shimp
Shirk
Showman
Shrutleff
Shufeldt
Shumaker
Shupp
Siaca
Sims
Singer
Sisson
Skillern
Skinner
Sloan
Smith
Solomon
Somerfield
Southern
Sparks
Spencer
Spillers
Spooner
Springstrum
Stambaugh
Stanfield
Staples
Starring
Staunton
Steel
Steele
Stevens
Stevenson
Stewart
Stickling
Stone
Stout
Stover
Strotz
Studebaker
Stumpp
Sullivan
Summers
Swanson
Swartz
Swearengin
Symons
Taboer
Tate
Taylor
Temple
Templeman
Terry
Test photo
Thomas
Thompson
Thornton
Thorp
Threthaway
Tibbals
Tibbbals
Tillery
Tipton
Toksvig
Toomey
Topper
Topping
Towar
Townsend
Trautman
Trees
Trieber
Trotter
True
Truitt
Tucker
Tull
Turrill
Tuttle
Tyler
Ulsh
Urbatch
Vail
Valente
Van Brunt
Van Buren
Van Hook
Van Horn
Vandersall
Vanderslice
Vanhousen
Vannostrand
Vanwicklin
Varnam
Vernon
Vincil
Vinke
Vogel
Voltz
Von Der Lancken
Vose
Wadlin
Wages
Waggoner
Wagner
Wait
Wakefield
Walker
Walkup
Wall
Wallace
Warfield
Warner
Waters
Watkinsn
Weatherly
Weaver
Webster
Weeks
Weiringer
Welch
Wells
Welsh
Wendt
Werner
West
Wheeler
Wheelock
White
Whitfield
Whitham
Whittaker
Whitten
Widner
Wildhagen
Wilke
Willcox
Williams
Williamson
Williford
Willsey
Wilson
Winburn
Winder
Winkler
Wiser
Witte
Wolfe
Wood
Woodring
Woods
Worthen
Worthlley
Wren
Wright
Wweiringer
Wyman
Young
Zavitz
Zeller
Ziegler
Zittle
Zug

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12527.jpg
William John & John William Moncrief
South Monaghan, Ontario
Canada
Comments = Twin brothers of my great-great-grandmother, Mary Jane Moncrief.

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12402.jpg
Hugh Steel
Oklahoma
United States
Comments = The Band. If you need a close-up, write histroy101@aol.com for details. The 1936 TOM TOM Yearbook of Tulsa Central High School in Tulsa, OK. To see all the photos scanned to date from this yearbook, type the letter T in the photographer search field. Joe@deadfred.com

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12424.jpg
Norma Leaman
West Lampeter, PA
United States
Comments = This is a class trip photo to Washington D.C.; a more panoramic view of this photo can be seen if you type Capitol in the surname field. Student/1923 West Lampeter Vocational School, West Lampeter Lancaster Co, PA. For close-up images of any of these photos, e-mail histroy101@aol.com or Joe@deadfred.com.

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12438.jpg
Ellis Beck
Jamestown, NY
United States
Comments = The Cornell Architect_Quarterly /1916 Cornellian ,Yearbook for Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. To view all the images of this yearbook that have been added, type 'Cornell ' in the photographer search field in the "Detailed Search" option. Joe@deadfred.com

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12489.jpg
Beulah Larkin
Elgin, IL
United States
Comments = Students of 1918 Maroon, Elgin High School Annual, Elgin, IL. To see all the pictures in the album, type ELGIN in the photographer search field in the 'Detailed Search' option. For close-up images of any of these photos, e-mail Joe@deadfred.com or Histroy101@aol.com.

To view all identified photos added in the last 30 days (including today), go to http://www.deadfred.com/search/allsubmissions.php.

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Recognize These Faces?

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12312.jpg
State = CA
Country = United States
Comments = Sophomore Class of 1922 Yearbook, The Netherlands, Rio Vista Joint Union High School, Rio Vista, California. To see all the identified photos from this yearbook, type "RV" in the photographer search field in the "Detailed Search" option. To see all the unidentified photos, type "RV" in the photographer search field in the Mysteries section. Contact Joe@Deadfred.com

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12495.jpg
Country = Canada
Comments = The only thing on the back of this photo is "Tent Place, Seeley."

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12521.jpg
Comments = Standing, bearded man in uniform.

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12525.jpg
State = Ontario
Country = Canada
Comments = Young, handsome man seated.

http://www.deadfred.com/photos/12530.jpg
State = Ontario
Country = Canada
Comments = Seated lady with hat and cane.

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DeadFred Creative Writing Contest

Thank you to everyone who participated in our first Creative Writing Contest! Congratulations to Poetry Winner Catherine Moran of Little Rock, AR, and Fiction Winner Robby Edwards of Prairie Grove, AR.

We would also like to recognize the following entrants for their participation and creative talents:
Connie Vogel Westing of Fayetteville, AR
Lacinda Files of Rogers, AR

Winners and participants will be notified by mail.

On The Wharf
Catherine Moran

"Let's feed the pelican.
He looks so hungry and lonely for love.
We have each other,
but he is alone."

I can hardly hear your words.
I am starving beside the water
longing for the absent crumbs of your passion.
I sit as still as a white feather caught on the wharf,
with all curls in tact,
afraid to look sideways for fear I will blow away.

"Here, look at him huddled
against the wind.
I wish I could reach far enough
to pet him."

You could reach me once with one touch.
On the porch of the sea
we sat
tasting the salt of lips and words,
feeling our bodies crest with the waves.
Now we are drowned in tides of everyday,
and the silent currents push
us into dark channels that have no end.

"He's not afraid.
He's not flying away from me
at all."

Now only my body takes the space next to you,
for all else has flown away.
I remain pinned to the wall,
and the only sign of life is a white feather
ruffling in the morning wind.


Untitled
Robby Edwards

Crying herself to sleep at midnight and sleeping no more than two hours, June leaves her east-side house before her father awakes to walk along the lake. An overcast September morning, the wind is blowing in off Lake Michigan, and she thankfully has the pier to herself.

With the wind swirling, she replays in her mind the last five months, day by day, and second-guesses her decision to postpone college.

"April 11, why did I go to Pete's Pizzeria?" she asks.

June and two friends, Lisa and Betsy, always went to Pete's on Mondays after school. Their senior year at Robeson High School was winding down, and they were excited about going to college in the fall.

Bobby, more handsome and athletically built than her two previous boyfriends and also five years older at 23, changed June's plans. It started when he simply asked if Pete's pizzas were any good.

He walked her home that night, leaving his buddies behind to finish their pie and swig a few beers. A Tulsa, Oklahoma, native, Bobby had been in Chicago just over a month. He adjusted to big-city life, especially after his new best girl showed him around.

He made good money and treated June royally. He called often, even more when traveling out of town. When out together, at the theatre, movies, Pete's or any pizza place, strangers always talked to Bobby like they knew him. He and June enjoyed the attention.

In recent weeks, he wasn't meeting his manager's expectations. He tried to recover, but the pressure was too much.

"I know I wasn't a distraction," June said, defending herself against his excuses. "Why couldn't he have done better? Why did he have to go? Why did my family like him? Why didn't I just go to school like I planned?"

June's father, Dan, liked, no, worshipped Bobby. They would often sit and talk baseball for hours. Her brothers, 14-year-old Billy and 12-year-old Stan, often joined them.

Sitting on the pier staring across the water, June clutches the bag of Sun-Times clippings about Bobby, not sure if she wants to read them or toss them in the lake. Mentally, she names several shops where she can work to save for tuition at the University of Illinois in Champaign the following year. She doesn't notice someone sit down beside her.

"Hey, I was talking all the way down the pier, but I don't guess you could hear me. This might sound strange, but I just got into town last night. I was so excited about being here that I couldn't sleep, so I was looking around before I report today. I saw you out here by yourself and thought you could tell me what's here. My name's Eddie."

A lean six feet, two inches tall and 180 pounds, he has a similar build to Bobby and is wearing his only suit, which he purchased with a cash advance promotion just two days before.

"No, I can't tell you what's here. I came out here to be alone." June's eyes never leave the water.

"I can't believe how windy it is here," Eddie says in a Cajun accent without realizing her response. "What lake is this? What should I see first? Do you know how to get to Wrigley Field? This lake looks like an ocean. Does everybody talk about the Cubs? Where's a good place for coffee? Are the pizzas at Pete's any good?"

June continues staring ahead.

"Miss," he says politely.

No response. Arms folded across the chest, when the wind swirls, she acknowledges Eddie's presence only by sliding her left hand to her lap to keep the wind from blowing up her dress. Bobby's clippings are in her right hand.

Eddie doesn't notice the flapping dress. He focuses on the newspaper clippings sticking out of the bag.

"Whatcha got there?" he asks, reaching for it.

June pulls it into her chest and turns away.

"I'm sorry. I'm sorry to bother you. I guess people aren't as friendly here as they are in Morgan City, Louisiana, or Des Moines, Iowa, for that matter."

"Did you say Des Moines?" she asks surprisingly as Eddie stands to leave.

"Yes, I did. I was there for almost two years, but I'm just a Cajun boy from down on the bayous. You probably can't get any crawfish in this lake, can you?"

She stares at him, not really listening, then turns back to the water.

"Hey, I think I can get you a ticket to the Cubs game today. I don't know if you are a fan or not, but I don't have anyone else to invite, and you look like you might could use a day at the park. Maybe the sun will be out."

"How can you get me a ticket, and what makes you think I want to see a baseball game?" she snaps.

"I'm a ballplayer. I play right field. I was in the minors and didn't think I would make it to the majors this year, but the right fielder was having a rough time. I'm replacing..."

Before he finishes, she says: "...Bobby Gill, who was sent down to the minor league team in Des Moines."

"How did you know? Bobby started off real good. He was hitting .280 at the all-star break with 10 home runs and around 40 batted in. His average is down to about .210, and he's hit only..."

"...two home runs since," she finishes his sentence again.

"That's right. I've never met a girl who knew so much about baseball. Are you a Cubs fan? Do you want to go to the game?"

With her hands still on her dress, and again facing the lake, she tells him Wrigley Field is on Waveland Avenue off Lakeview, and today the wind is blowing straight in over the right field wall.

Send your questions or comments about this story to jeannette@deadfred.com.

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Join The DEADFREDdotCOM Group

Dead Fred has recently teamed up with Yahoo! Groups to offer you a free, easy-to-use e-mail group service. The DEADFREDdotCOM Group gives those interested in genealogy photos a place to meet, interact, and share ideas with one another. The Group is a valuable resource for Dead Fred's Genealogy Photo Archive's growing online community. Using Yahoo! Groups, you can do the following:

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Send your questions or comments about this story to jeannette@deadfred.com.

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Claire's Top Picks

http://www.gensuck.com
This is a web site that deals with the controversial issues about genealogy. Steve and David developed this site for those that are interested in genealogy. They want to inform you about and want you to contribute genealogy sites that are 'useless and poorly designed.' Issues are discussed in an "on the air" radio show format. The site is interesting and informative.

http://www.obitcentral.com
This is a fascinating web site. Obituary Central wants to provide you with obituaries. They have many links to help you find information in regards to obituaries, cemetery inscriptions and so much more. Bookmark Obituary Central.

http://www.beliefnet.ancestry.com/library/view/columns/eastman/3404.php
This is an interesting article about two companies working together in order to create a genealogy product. OneGreatFamily.com and Encarta.com are creating a software program that will provide its users with wonderful research tools and references. Read this article to find out more.

Send your questions or comments about this story to claire@deadfred.com.

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Server Switch Brings Added Bonuses

We at Dead Fred want to thank all of you for your patience while we switched to a different server. With the new server, however, we can offer more cool features for your enjoyment and convenience!

Dead Fred's database has grown approximately five times in size thanks to your support this year! We now have over 7,500 records. Due to the great magnitude of photo submissions we receive on a daily basis, we decided it was a fine time to move into a bigger place to better accommodate our valued visitors.

With the new, larger server, Dead Fred's Genealogy Photo Archive has 3 times the room it had before the switch! Furthermore, users now have the choice to display their contact e-mail addresses with their photograph submissions. Lastly, visitors can click on any displayed e-mail to get a comprehensive list of all photos submitted by that particular contributor.

Send your questions or comments about this story to jeannette@deadfred.com.

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Christmas Is Coming

Today is Sunday, August 26, 2001, at 12:34:30 p.m. I have only 4 months, 2 days, 11 hours, 24 minutes and 30 seconds until Christmas. At my local Hallmark store, the snowmen are already sitting by the windows holding their "Let It Snow" signs. This week I received 5 "Christmas" catalogs. Each year we are preparing for Christmas a little earlier than the last.

This year I have decided to make Christmas gifts rather than buy them. I wanted to make the gifts with a genealogy theme, but I also wanted the gifts to be age-appropriate. I soon discovered some very interesting and informative web sites to help me with my Christmas endeavor.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~tnstewar/chrisidea.htm is a genealogy Christmas idea web site. People have contributed their gift ideas. Some of the ideas are very creative such as the family genealogy book, memory ornaments, family recipe collection and genealogy Christmas tree. There are eleven ideas in all, and there is a contact person, Jan, at unicorn@sun-spot.com if you would like to contribute your own ideas.

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Estates/7923/ is a graphics web site developed by Chris. If you would like to create a genealogy scrapbook or calendar for your family, Chris has some fantastic genealogy graphics to accompany your project.

http://genealogy.about.com/library/weekly/aa111900a.htm is Kimberly Powell's holiday gifts for genealogists. There are some great ideas here. Some of them are on the expensive side, i.e. a new computer and paid trip to a genealogy conference, but some of them are inexpensive and fun, i.e. heirloom seeds and a Christmas coupon book.

http://www.storypreservation.com/gifts.html is a unique web site that offers families an extremely inexpensive Christmas gift-giving idea, Sharing Stories. The Center For Life Stories Preservation provides five ways to capture your family history, and they also provide sample letters and guidelines to help you create a successful family story. They also welcome any questions and ideas.

Some of these gift ideas will take some time to make. You may want to start gathering your materials now. But before I leave you with this wonderful parody, I would like to be the first to wish you a Happy Christmas.

http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.com/~cswitzer/gen12days.htm

The Twelfth Day of a Genealogy Christmas

On the twelfth day of Christmas,
My true love gave to me,
Twelve census searches,
Eleven printer ribbons,
Ten e-mail contacts,
Nine headstone rubbings,
Eight birth and death dates,
Seven town clerks sighing,
Six second cousins,
Five coats of arms,
Four GEDCOM files,
Three old wills,
Two CD-ROMs,
And a branch in my family tree.

Send your questions or comments about this story to claire@deadfred.com.

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Good Internet Web Sites To Find Maps Of All Kinds

A few days ago, Ann Biggs Williams visited me and brought me some genealogical magazines. She told me I could use them or get rid of them. I decided to go through them and see if there was anything that might be of interest.

I found a page of information about maps. Now if you haven't heard me talk about the importance of maps, let me tell you that I believe in them for doing genealogical research. When I first started doing research many years ago, I realized the need for some maps. You need them to locate a particular piece of property that your ancestor may have owned. Alabama is one of those states that is surveyed on a township, range and section program, and it is fairly easy to locate where your ancestors lived a long time ago. You go to the courthouse, find the original tract book or deed records, find the township, range and section of land and you will know exactly where your ancestor's property was located.

Another importance of maps is to locate the cemeteries that you will want to visit and how to get there. Believe me when I say, you do not want to wander around trying to find a cemetery.

I always go back to the maps that I use to check out a particular area when I plan to make a visit. You won't believe the amount of time you can save by knowing where you are going. I used to make trips to South Carolina, and one of my maps was of Kershaw County. I studied it, and when the time came to go out into the countryside looking for cemeteries, I knew exactly where I was headed. My husband's aunt had lived there for many years and she said I knew my way around better than she did.

Now, back to the genealogical magazines. One of them had an interesting list of geographical sources and I thought I would pass them along to you.

http://geonames.usgs.gov/geonames/gnis.html
Geographic Names Information Center for the United States and Territories is a site where you can find information about the entire United States. For example, you can obtain a listing of items in a specific state or county, by simply choosing the appropriate options such as a list of cemeteries in a county or all the churches in a county.

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/Libs/PCL/Map_collection/histus.html
Historical Maps of the United States is a site linked to scanned images of maps that are of historic nature.

http://jrshelby.com/genmap/maps.htm
Historical County Lines is a site that contains links to state maps throughout the United States. It is an excellent starting place to look for county boundary maps on the Internet.

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/gmdhtml/gmdhome.html
Railroad Maps 1828-1900 is an interesting one. The Library of Congress provides some excellent scans of railroad maps for this time period. You can zoom and magnify your display in order to focus on a specific map. This makes reading the names of small towns and stops easy. Browse the collection geographically or by railway name. When printed on a laser printer, the highly magnified maps are very readable. This site is a part of a larger site of maps at the Library of Congress.

http://www.livgenmi.com/1895.htm
1895 United States Atlas should be your first stop when you are attempting to locate a late nineteenth century village. This site contains scanned images of the entire 1895 United States atlas, along with an index of what towns are contained within the counties.

I want to end this column with a story that I read. It was written by Jan Lindstrom.

As excavation was going on at an old building, Fred noticed a large trunk through the broken window. He yelled for the excavator operator to stop, and with his help, the trunk was pulled from the building. Fred carried the trunk home and told his wife about it. She, of course, wanted to know what was in the trunk. Fred didn't know and told her that he thought it might be worth checking. They had to break the padlock on the trunk and found it to be full of books, newspapers, a child's sturdy shoes and small decorated tins. There remained a few boxes and when they were opened, Fred and his wife discovered that they were full of handwritten letters. They were written in Scandinavian. Fred's wife, Jennie, said that her parents had roots in Sweden. She picked up the letters and turned them over and read the address on the envelope. She was so surprised to find that the letters were addressed to her grandmother. Immediately after the shock of the letters came the realization that there were also pictures in the trunk and on the back of one were written the names of Jennie's grandmother and her siblings.

It suddenly struck Jennie that her grandmother's home was the one that had been torn down and she started to cry. As soon as she could, she took the letters and pictures to an old lady who could translate them. The old lady realized that Jennie had found a tie to her past, and as they talked, Jennie also discovered her interest in her family's past. She began to wonder if maybe her grandmother's place of birth could still be standing in Sweden.

Sometime later she was able to go to Sweden and found the house. She was hooked on genealogy.

You see, it can happen in the strangest of ways.

Happy hunting.

This article can be found at http://www.brewtonstandard.com/brewtonstandard/myarticles.php?H=1&S=293&P=413475&PubID=6916

Search the archives at http://www.brewtonstandard.com for more articles.

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About The Co-Editors

Claire Bott, Joe's daughter-in-law, maintains the phenomenal traffic flow of DeadFred.com. She conducts essential research for site content development, reviews and edits records and responds to e-mail correspondence. Contact her at claire@deadfred.com.

Copywriter Jeannette Balleza writes and edits promotional materials for DeadFred.com and related projects. With public relations as her primary focus, she assists in marketing and advertising efforts to both attract support and generate awareness for the site. Contact her at jeannette@deadfred.com.

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